Tuesday, October 2, 2007


Carburetors are classified as either float-type or pressure-type. Pressure carburetors are usually not found on small airplanes. The basic difference between a pressure carburetor and a float-type is the pressure carburetor delivers fuel under pressure by a fuel pump.

In the operation of the float-type carburetor system, the outside air first flows through an air filter, usually located at an air intake in the front part of the engine cowling. This filtered air flows into the carburetor and through a venturi, a narrow throat in the carburetor.

When the air flows through the venturi, a low-pressure area is created, which forces the fuel to flow through a main fuel jet located at the throat. The fuel then flows into the airstream, where it is mixed with the flowing air.
The fuel/air mixture is then drawn through the intake manifold and into the combustion chambers, where it is ignited. The "float-type carburetor" acquires its name from a float, which rests on fuel within the float chamber. A needle attached to the float opens and closes an opening at the bottom of the carburetor bowl. This meters the correct amount of fuel into the carburetor, depending upon the position of the float, which is controlled by the level of fuel in the float chamber. When the level of the fuel forces the float to rise, the needle valve closes the fuel opening and shuts off the fuel flow to the carburetor. The needle valve opens again when the engine requires additional fuel.

The flow of the fuel/air mixture to the combustion chambers is regulated by the throttle valve, which is controlled by the throttle in the cockpit.

No comments:

Post a Comment